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Ohlone Library Course Reserves FAQ

Physical Reserves

Location

Physical reserve materials are shelved
behind the circulation desks
in the Fremont Campus Library
and in the Newark Center LRC.

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What are Physical Course Reserves?

Physical course reserves are educational materials selected by faculty to support primary course readings. Reserves may include paper-based supplemental readings, audio and video recordings, or software. Sometimes, a copy of the course textbook may also be placed on reserve.

How Can Faculty Submit Physical Course Reserves?

Instructors may place physical materials on reserve by printing out this form, filling it out completely, and, if the material is not part of the library collection, bringing it along with reserve materials to the circulation desk. (You must have the Adobe Reader program installed on your computer to view this form. Download the free Adobe Reader program.)

Instructors may place a link in Blackboard or on their web sites that connects students to a listing of their course reserves in HANS. Please contact if you are interested in doing this.

How Do Students Find Physical Course Reserves?

Reserve items are cataloged in HANS, the Ohlone College Online Catalog. Select the Course Reserve tab and then search by your instructor's name or your course number. Please ask a librarian if you are having trouble locating Reserve Materials.

You may also find a link in Blackboard or on your class web site that displays a listing of that course's reserves in HANS. (Instructors please contact if you are interested in doing this.)

Most Reserve items are library use only, but some may be borrowed overnight or longer. Ask at the checkout desk to determine the status of each item.

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Electronic Course Reserves (E-Reserves)

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What are e-reserves?

E-reserves are electronic content an instructor chooses to make available to his or her students through the library course reserve system. This content may include instructor-generated documents such as lecture notes, sample tests and solution sets. E-reserves may also include links to library-licensed database articles, links to other online content such as web sites, or, with restrictions, digitized versions of book chapters or journal articles.

How can faculty submit e-reserves?

First, read our policy.

Second, determine if your reading is available electronically in one of our databases (use this tool).

Third, submit your request(s) by emailing Library technician with the following information:

FOR ALL REQUESTS INCLUDE:

  • Your name, phone number, and email address
  • Your course department and number
  • Complete citation to any requested article or book chapter
  • Which semester you are requesting the reserve for

FOR ARTICLES IN OUR DATABASES ALSO INCLUDE:

  • Database you found the article in

FOR WEB SITES OR ARTICLES AVAILABLE ON THE OPEN WEB INCLUDE:

  • URL of the resource.

FOR READINGS NOT IN OUR DATABASES FOR WHICH YOU HAVE THE HARD COPY, PLEASE BRING A CLEAN COPY TO THE LIBRARY. Per the limitations in our e-reserve policy we will scan the document and place it on e-reserve for one semester. For documents exceeding our policy guidelines, you are responsible for securing copyright permissions to continue posting the reading, and you will need to submit to us a signed copyright compliance form in order for us to continue posting the document. (See copyright resources below for more information.)

How do students find e-reserves?

Reserve items are cataloged in HANS, the Ohlone College Online Catalog. Select the Course Reserve tab and then search by your instructor's name or your course number. Please ask a librarian if you are having trouble locating Reserve Materials.

You may also find a link in Blackboard or on your class web site that displays a listing of that course's reserves in HANS. (Instructors please contact if you are interested in doing this.)

Does the library have a written policy about e-reserves?

Yes, here it is:

Ohlone College Library
Electronic Reserves (e-reserves) Policy

With this policy, Ohlone College Library intends to comply with all copyright laws and to honor the principles of fair use for educational purposes.

1. Whenever possible, we will create electronic reserves by "linking" to sources included in our subscription databases, or to "open web" sources, opening the link in a new window, with the original URL showing. These links may be made without limitations and without obtaining permissions.

2. If an article is not in a library-licensed database but is something the library or a faculty member owns in another format, we will digitize the materials (in a format compatible with screen-readers and similar assistive technologies) with the following limitations:
• No more than 25 pages total;
• No more than 1 article from a single journal;
• No more than 1 chapter or 10% of a single book.

3. We will place digitized materials on a secured drive, accessible through our course reserve search, requiring students to log in to view them, and displaying appropriate copyright attribution.

4. We will leave reserves online for one semester, after which they will be removed. (If the material is determined to be in the public domain, or where the faculty owns the copyrights to the material, e.g.: original lecture notes, there will be no need to remove it, or to consider step five below.)

5. For copyrighted materials following the first semester use, or in cases where desired quantities exceed the above limitations, or where the college does not own an original hardcopy, the faculty member is responsible for getting permissions to use the materials, and must sign a copyright compliance form saying they have done so.

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Copyright Resources for Faculty

 

When do I NOT Need to get copyright permissions?

You do not need to get permissions to use the following categories of materials as course reserves:

  • your original work for which you own the copyrights, such as lecture notes, sample exams, solution sets, etc.
  • works in the public domain.
  • content "linked to" in library-licensed databases.
  • content "linked to" on the open web.
  • materials falling under "fair use" guidelines, with limited extent and limited time of posting.

When do I need to get Copyright permissions?

The library policy on e-reserves asks that you get copyright permissions to use any copyrighted materials that exceed fair use guidelines. Per our policy, this includes repeated or long term use of copyrighted materials (more than one semester's use), or first time use of such materials if the extent of use exceeds our policy guidelines:

• No more than 25 pages total;
• No more than 1 article from a single journal;
• No more than 1 chapter or 10% of a single book.

However, please remember that our policy guidelines are general in nature and attempt to address a concept, Fair Use, which is really intended to be a deliberative exercise on a case-by-case basis. This complexity is why it is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with Fair Use principles and recognize when your intended use may exceed justifiable Fair Use. For example, if your course reserve readings are the majority of your readings for a course, even if they meet the guidelines above, they may exceed fair use guidelines.

Doesn't Fair Use mean I don't have to worry about copyright in a college setting?

No. The purpose of the use (for teaching) is only one of the factors to consider in determining whether a particular use would be considered "fair." An example of the type of academic use that has been considered by the courts to constitute Fair Use would be use that is "spontaneous;" e.g.: when an instructor brings to class copies of the political cartoon from that morning's newspaper. Brief discussions on the complexity and limitations of fair use are available from the Copyright Clearance Center and from the U.S. Copyright Office.

So what good is Fair Use?

Still, we must try.

What about the Teach Act -- Doesn't that help me?

We wish it did, but no. The Teach Act [pdf], which was passed in 2002 to provide copyright guidance for academic institutions incorporating digital media in online distance education, specifically excludes course reserves from its provisions. At least that is more straightforward than fair use!

How can I secure copyright permissions?

For portions of books or journal articles, we recommend that you use the academic pay-per-use permissions service available at The Copyright Clearance Center.

Will the library pay royalties for materials I want to use?

The library doesn't have a fund for this expense. Check with your division dean for alternatives.

This is way too much trouble. What else can I do?

Remember that the library already subscribes to numerous databases containing full-text articles covering topics across the curriculum. If your article is the seminal reading on a particular topic and you need your students to read it, then we recommend you make a reasonable effort to secure permission to use it, or place it on reserve in hardcopy at the circulation desk. If on the other hand the article is only one example of readings on a topic, then you may be able to find an alternative article within the resources we already own. Librarians are available to help with navigating our resources and locating high-quality, scholarly readings.

 

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This document was last modified: Wednesday, 23-Apr-2014 09:29:27 Pacific Daylight Time